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Ebook The Garden Party by Katherine Mansfield read! Book Title: The Garden Party
The author of the book: Katherine Mansfield
Edition: Echo Library
Date of issue: July 1st 2003
Format files: PDF
The size of the: 2.20 MB
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Loaded: 2461 times
Reader ratings: 4.6
ISBN: 1846373964
ISBN 13: 9781846373961
Language: English

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Piazza del Duomo is my least favourite place in Florence. I always hurry through it. Probably San Marco (except at four in the morning) and St Peters are my least favourite places in, respectively, Venice and Rome so I guess I just don’t respond very well to the grandiose. I prefer what’s smaller, more secret, more ostensibly self-effacing. A criticism often levelled at Katherine Mansfield’s stories are that they are small things, limited in scope. Lawrence in Women in Love famously depicted her as Gudren, a brilliant but limited miniaturist. She herself, close to death, remarked that she’d only produced “little stories like birds bred in cages”.

She’s often compared (unfavourably) with Virginia Woolf. But it’s worth remembering that had Woolf died the same year as Mansfield she would only have written her first three books (The Voyage Out, Night and Day and Jacob’s Room) and consequently almost certainly would not now be known to us as one of the great moderns. In all probability her reputation would be on a par with many of the more obscure women writers of that time now published by Virago. Had she died at the same age as Mansfield she would only have written The Voyage Out. Herein lies the tragedy of KM’s early death. Had she lived even another ten years it’s not unlikely she would have gone on to equal Woolf’s achievement. The best stories in this collection are more innovative and fresh and lively than anything Woolf had written at this time. In fact she makes Woolf appear at this point in her writing career a bit of a stiff frumpy Victorian in comparison.

She knew she was going to die while writing many of these stories and this is evident in the wonder the natural world has for her ( easy to see why her and Lawrence got on so well – both take the same kind of delight in the natural world. Woolf’s nature descriptions, on the other hand, are always more aridly intellectualised.) It’s also evident in the depths of loneliness and longing in virtually all the characters, the alienation they feel from the warm vibrant central thrust of life. But never does she strike a morbid or self-pitying note. Mostly she writes with great wit and vitality and a keen eye for the telling detail of any given moment. She’s also brilliant at extracting nuggets of gold from the mundane. In one story, Ma Parker is a housekeeper whose beloved grandson has just died. She cleans for a literary gentleman every Tuesday. The literary gentleman offers his condolences but his real concern is to reproach her for mislaying a spoon of cocoa. People wonder how Nazism happened or Aleppo goes on happening. Here’s how – at bottom the absence of cocoa in the house is more likely to rouse us to protest than the suffering of a fellow human being we don’t know.

The first three stories – At the Bay, The Garden Party and The daughters of the Late Colonel are absolute gems. The other stories are mostly tremendously readable without quite hitting the heights of the first three and there’s a couple of duds towards the end.
My favourite photo of her -




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Ebook The Garden Party read Online! Kathleen Mansfield Murry was a prominent New Zealand modernist writer of short fiction who wrote under the pen name of Katherine Mansfield.

Katherine Mansfield is widely considered one of the best short story writers of her period. A number of her works, including "Miss Brill", "Prelude", "The Garden Party", "The Doll's House", and later works such as "The Fly", are frequently collected in short story anthologies. Mansfield also proved ahead of her time in her adoration of Russian playwright and short story writer Anton Chekhov, and incorporated some of his themes and techniques into her writing.

Katherine Mansfield was part of a "new dawn" in English literature with T S Elliot, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf. She was associated with the brilliant group of writers who made the London of the period the centre of the literary world.

Nevertheless, Mansfield was a New Zealand writer - she could not have written as she did had she not gone to live in England and France, but she could not have done her best work if she had not had firm roots in her native land. She used her memories in her writing from the beginning, people, the places, even the colloquial speech of the country form the fabric of much of her best work.

Mansfield's stories were the first of significance in English to be written without a conventional plot. Supplanting the strictly structured plots of her predecessors in the genre (Edgar Allan Poe, Rudyard Kipling, H. G. Wells), Mansfield concentrated on one moment, a crisis or a turning point, rather than on a sequence of events. The plot is secondary to mood and characters. The stories are innovative in many other ways. They feature simple things - a doll's house or a charwoman. Her imagery, frequently from nature, flowers, wind and colours, set the scene with which readers can identify easily.

Themes too are universal: human isolation, the questioning of traditional roles of men and women in society, the conflict between love and disillusionment, idealism and reality, beauty and ugliness, joy and suffering and the inevitabilty of these paradoxes. Oblique narration (influenced by Chekhov but certainly developed by Mansfield) includes the use of symbolism - the doll's house lamp, the fly, the pear tree - hinting at the hidden layers of meaning. Suggestion and implication replace direct detail.




Reviews of the The Garden Party


ALBERT

Not when you can say the book is better.

RYAN

Bogus! You could have done better.

ZOE

Interesting, exciting story.

ALEXANDER

Why are you asking to write a phone number?

ZOE

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