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Ebook Tales From The Perilous Realm 'Farmer Giles Of Ham', 'Smith Of Wootton Major', 'The Adventures Of Tom Bombadil', 'Leaf By Niggle by J.R.R. Tolkien read! Book Title: Tales From The Perilous Realm 'Farmer Giles Of Ham', 'Smith Of Wootton Major', 'The Adventures Of Tom Bombadil', 'Leaf By Niggle
The author of the book: J.R.R. Tolkien
Edition: BBC
Date of issue: 2002
Format files: PDF
The size of the: 14.61 MB
City - Country: No data
Loaded: 1674 times
Reader ratings: 7.3
ISBN: 0563528087
ISBN 13: 9780563528081
Language: English

Read full description of the books:



Tolkien is often remembered for his vast fantasy worlds but he also wrote simple things, shorter works more in touch with the humorous themes of The Hobbit rather than the sense of darkness that permeates The Lord of the Rings. I’ve been reading through them again lately and they can all be found in this edition that collects the main ones together.

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil

Tom Bombadil is such an enigma. I mean who exactly is he? Some Tolkien fans would argue that he is Eru, the creator of all life within Tolkien’s Middle Earth, though I think somewhat differently. He breaks any sense of definition with his odd existence: he simply is. We can’t say for a certainty either way, but we do know that Tolkien wanted him to remain somewhat mysterious and beyond the realms of categorisation. I don’t think Tolkien quite knew what he wanted him to be. So that’s how I treat him.

He appears briefly in The Lord of the Rings, saving Frodo from the barrow wight, and spends most of the time singing in odd verses about himself. In this book the Hobbit poet captures his image:

Old Tom Bombadil was a merry fellow;
Bright blue his jacket was and his boots were yellow
Green were his girdle and his breeches all of leather,
He wore in his hat a swan-wing feather.
He lived up under Hill, where the Withyywindle
Ran from a grassy well down into the dingle.



Bombadil leads an odd, somewhat quaint, existence. His behaviour is equated with the natural world; he wonders in fields and exists among the trees. Perhaps his character, at least on the surface, is a simple version of man: a man who remains untroubled by the problems of the world and is just happy to spend his days singing, frolicking and remaining a complete mystery.

However, I don’t feel like the title of this is overly appropriate. If anything, it is very misleading. Only two of the poems actually focus on Bombadil, the rest talk about all manner of random things Middle Earth related. So we have two Bombadil adventures, followed by twelve other poems that address things from Cats to Oliphaunts. Then there’s one that’s rumoured to have been written by Frodo himself, describing a vague dream he had about his experience with the ring.

I find it truly hilarious that Tolkien effectively has a counter for any criticisms of weak poems within this book. In the preface, he says that this book was written by Hobbits. Their rhyming structures and metre are a watered down version of Elvish poetry; thus, any remarks about the weakness of such writing can be aimed at the limitations of Hobbit verse. He side-steps the negative reactions with such a statement, and it’s incredibly ironic and self-preserving. It made me laugh. So this book is a construct of Hobbit writing, and, once again, Tolkien gives his world more foundation.

It's a fun collection of verses, but by no means anything remarkable in Tolkien’s world. The scholarship that has gone into my edition is of a very good standard, it tells the history of this book’s publication. And if you are interested in reading this book, I do recommend this edition edited by Scull and Hammond. Other than that, I’d say that this one is likely to appeal more to the serious Tolkien enthusiast rather than the casual fan.

Farmer Giles of Ham

This is a great little tale full of bravery, heroism and Tolkien’s ever so subtle humour.

Farmer Giles saves his farm and, as a consequence, the local village from a rampaging giant. This earns him a fierce reputation for heroism; thus, he is rewarded by the King with a rather glamourous sword. The King, believing this to be a mere ceremonial weapon, parts with the blade gladly. It turns out that the sword is actually Tailbiter, an ancient weapon that carries a powerful enchantment. Indeed, it cannot physically be sheathed when in close proximity to a dragon.

Can you guess what happens next?

A dragon appears! Bet you didn’t see that coming. He attacks the surrounding villages and there is little anyone can do to stop him. Naturally Farmer Giles is called upon for help, though he is very reluctant. He is old and who actually wants to fight dragons? His only act of heroism was defence of his own land, this is a different situation. He fears he may not be up to the task. But nonetheless due to the constant pestering of the villages, he resolves himself and hunts down the dragon. He opts to take a more tactical approach that the strutting knights of the realm:

“Well,” said Giles,” if it is you notion to go dragon hunting jingling and dinging like Canterbury Bells it ain’t mine. It don’t seem sense to me to let a dragon to let a dragon know that you are coming along the road sooner than need be.”



Giles has an interesting way of dealing with his problems. Instead of taking the predicted direction, the hack and slash route, he chooses a more careful approach. This in its self is a much more logical solution and leaves the tale going into unexpected directions. Instead of slaying the dragon he makes a deal with him and after forcing the dragon to complete his end of the bargain, they become unlikely friends. The dragon is bound to his service out of a respect for Giles and a fear of his sword. Trouble strikes when the King of the realm hears of the treasure Giles has taken for himself. He wants it for the crown, but why should Giles give his hard earned treasure away? He’s now friends with a dragon. Not much the King can do.

So this was a fun tale; it’s definitely aimed at a younger audience, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. The ending was great, I do wish Tolkien has picked a more orginal name though for his hero.

Smith of Wooten Major

This tale is magical and enchanting but for me it seemed incomplete. Well, a little unresolved. A young boy gets to enter the wonderful world of Fay; he is chosen especially for it, but when he gets there he doesn’t do a great deal. I mean, talk about a wasted opportunity! I would have done so much more over there.

Every twenty-four years Wootton Major has a massive celebration feast. As per tradition, a giant cake is baked. In it is placed a star by an anonymous trickster. The star allows the person to enter the realm of Fay, a boon by all accounts. On entering the realm, and experiencing the power of it, the lucky person must then return home with the star for another child to be given the gift in another twenty-four years. To me it sounds like a fantastic opportunity. Imagine living in a dull boring world, not that hard to imagine really, and then you are given a little ticket to somewhere much better.

It’s a very simple story, one that avoids all dark themes. There are no cunning dragons or evil dark lords; instead we have the world of Fay. Sure there are some dangers involved in crossing the border, but I think all those that have the opportunity to cross it would overlook such peril in the face of such a chance. The story is written in Tolkien’s usual mastery of tone, but for me it needed something else. It needed a stronger sense of purpose and perhaps a greater point to it. This is far from Tolkien at his best. It's still worth a read though for enthusiasts of his writing.

For that he was grateful, for he soon became wise and understood that the marvels of Faery cannot be approached without danger, and that many of the Evils cannot be challenged without weapons of power too great for any mortal to wield. He remained a learner and explorer, not a warrior; and though in time he could have forged weapons that in his own world would have had power enough to become the matter of great tales and be worth a king's ransom, he knew that in Faery they would have been of small account. So among all the things that he made it is not remembered that he ever forged a sword or a spear or an arrow-head."



Roverandom

This is a fantastically childish book that is thoroughly charming; it really captures the essence of Tolkien’s softer themes and humour. Not everything has to be constantly dark and foreboding for his writing to be successful. This is simple, imaginative and a good little bit of fun.

The tale is quaint and fairly short in which a dog, initially named Rover, is turned into a toy as an act of revenge because he bit a mean old sand sorcerer. Some people really are that petty. This leads to a series of events in which the toy is washed up on a beach, learns to fly and finally ends up in the company of the Man in the Moon.

However, the Man in the Moon already has a dog named Rover; thus, he dubs the toy Roverandom. He temporarily grants him wings resulting in him and the other Rover being chased by a Dragon during one of their flights. A friendship blossoms between the two Rovers, though eventually Rover seeks to be a normal dog once more. He wants to go back to his normal life. And the only person who can reverse the magic is the one who cast it in the first place, but wizards are always tricky: he won’t simply do it for nothing.

The thing I enjoyed most about this story is learning about where it came from. Tolkien’s son lost his precious toy, so Tolkien wrote this story about what could have happened to it and where it might of gone after he lost it. Doesn’t he sound like a wonderful farther?

“I did nothing but run away from the time I was a puppy, and I kept on running and roving until one fine morning - a very fine morning, with the sun in my eyes - I fell over the world's edge chasing a butterfly.”



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Read information about the author

Ebook Tales From The Perilous Realm 'Farmer Giles Of Ham', 'Smith Of Wootton Major', 'The Adventures Of Tom Bombadil', 'Leaf By Niggle read Online! John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE, was an English writer, poet, WWI veteran (a First Lieutenant in the Lancashire Fusiliers, British Army), philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the high fantasy classic works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings .

Tolkien was Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford from 1925 to 1945, and Merton Professor of English language and literature from 1945 to 1959. He was a close friend of C.S. Lewis.

Christopher Tolkien published a series of works based on his father's extensive notes and unpublished manuscripts, including The Silmarillion . These, together with The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, form a connected body of tales, poems, fictional histories, invented languages, and literary essays about an imagined world called Arda, and Middle-earth within it. Between 1951 and 1955, Tolkien applied the word "legendarium" to the larger part of these writings.

While many other authors had published works of fantasy before Tolkien, the great success of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings led directly to a popular resurgence of the genre. This has caused Tolkien to be popularly identified as the "father" of modern fantasy literature—or more precisely, high fantasy. Tolkien's writings have inspired many other works of fantasy and have had a lasting effect on the entire field.

In 2008, The Times ranked him sixth on a list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945". Forbes ranked him the 5th top-earning dead celebrity in 2009.

Religious influences
J.R.R. Tolkien, was born in South Africa in 1892, but his family moved to Britain when he was about 3 years old. When Tolkien was 8 years old, his mother converted to Catholicism, and he remained a Catholic throughout his life. In his last interview, two years before his death, he unhesitatingly testified, “I’m a devout Roman Catholic.”

Tolkien married his childhood sweetheart, Edith, and they had four children. He wrote them letters each year as if from Santa Claus, and a selection of these was published in 1976 as The Father Christmas Letters . One of Tolkien’s sons became a Catholic priest. Tolkien was an advisor for the translation of the Jerusalem Bible .

Tolkien once described The Lord of the Rings to his friend Robert Murray, an English Jesuit priest, as "a fundamentally religious and Catholic work, unconsciously so at first, but consciously in the revision." There are many theological themes underlying the narrative including the battle of good versus evil, the triumph of humility over pride, and the activity of grace. In addition the saga includes themes which incorporate death and immortality, mercy and pity, resurrection, salvation, repentance, self-sacrifice, free will, justice, fellowship, authority and healing. In addition The Lord's Prayer "And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil" was reportedly present in Tolkien's mind as he described Frodo's struggles against the power of the "One Ring.''


Reviews of the Tales From The Perilous Realm 'Farmer Giles Of Ham', 'Smith Of Wootton Major', 'The Adventures Of Tom Bombadil', 'Leaf By Niggle


TOBY

Not impressed

MOHAMMED

On one Breath

DAISY

Energy text

ALEXANDER

The book is very deep! Tip for Reading.

IVY

I never liked the book.




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